Wildlands & Woodlands Website

Highstead works to inspire curiosity and build knowledge about plants and wooded landscapes in order to enhance life, preserve nature, and advance sound stewardship practices.


Highstead Welcomes Fall Interns

We are pleased to welcome three conservation interns who will work with Highstead staff to support conservation activities locally and throughout New England. Their work includes helping to plan the upcoming RCP Network Gathering, creating GIS maps for the Hudson to Housatonic RCP and Northern AT Landscape Partnership, and researching the economic impact of land conservation, among other tasks. More information on their special projects will be shared later this fall.

Photo: Emma Borjigin-Wang (Harvard University), Isabel Holland (Colby College), and Rebecca Beilinson (Yale University).

A Walk Through Time: Long-term Forest and Landscape Change Presentation


Over 60 guests attended our "walk through time," two presentations exploring the ecological history of Redding and southern New England. In celebration of Redding's 250th year, Dr. Wyatt Oswald, research fellow at Harvard Forest and professor at Emerson College, presented paleoecological evidence of vegetation change and its relationship to climate and fire over the past 10,000 years. Ed Faison, senior ecologist at Highstead, walked us through the past 400 years, beginning with the presettlement landscape and how European settlement dramatically shaped the forests we see today.

Photo credit: USDA Forest Service Bulletin 96(1912)

Highstead and Harvard Forest Broaden Vision for New England Landscape

A new report produced by the Harvard Forest, Highstead, and authors from around New England was released on September 19. Wildlands and Woodlands, Farmlands and Communities reaffirms the goals of the Wildlands and Woodlands vision introduced in 2010, and presents an integrated vision of wildlands, managed woodlands, farmlands, and rural to urban communities supporting people and nature across New England.

Learn more and download the report here.

Don't miss the 2017 Wildlands and Woodlands video!

 

Highstead Hosts Fall Art Exhibit


Highstead hosted an opening reception for the 20th annual Fall Art Exhibit Sunday, September 17. This year’s show is titled The Flora and Fauna of Highstead, featuring works rendered by the Greater New York Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators.

During the opening, the artists in attendance described their pieces and the significance behind their designs.

This lively collection showcasing plants and wildlife native to the Highstead landscape will be on display through October 27. Visitors are invited to view the show Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. .

 

Highstead’s Summer 2017 Newsletter

The charismatic Wood Thrush provides the connecting thread between the initiatives highlighted in Highstead’s Summer 2017 Newsletter. Alongside remarks on the Wood Thrush, read about the forthcoming release of the report Wildlands and Woodlands, Farmlands and Communities: Broadening the Vision for New England, an update to the 2010 Wildlands and Woodlands vision. Also read about the strategic conservation map guiding collaborative efforts of the Fairfield County Regional Conservation Partnership, and Highstead’s model of research-based forest conservation and stewardship on display throughout our interpretive trails. View a digital copy here.

    To request a copy, send a note to jcologgi@highstead.net.    

2017 RCP Network Gathering - Thursday, November 16



Join over 200 conservation professionals to explore new frontiers of collaboration at this year’s RCP Network Gathering on Thursday, November 16, 2017, at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Nashua, NH.

This annual day-long conference offers a venue to share your land conservation experiences, workshops to learn about the innovative practices of conservation collaborators, panel discussions highlighting success stories, and new networking opportunities.

Click here for information about RCPs, the RCP Network, and the RCP Network Gathering.